Child Support Obligations Even if not Married?

Is there potential for child support obligations even if you are not the child’s biological parent.  Yes. Similarly, can there be child support obligations even if you are not living with the child? Yes.

For a stepparent to have support obligations the following must be true:

  1. You must be considered a stepparent under the Family Law Act (FLA);
  2. The stepparent contributed to the support of the child for at least one year; and
  3. A proceeding for an order under this Part, against the stepparent, is started within one year after the date the stepparent last contributed to the support of the child.

 

  1. Being a Stepparent

A stepparent under the FLA means a person who is a spouse of the child’s parent and lived with the child’s parent and the child during the child’s life. Being a stepparent is therefore incumbent on the definition of “spouse” as well as “lived with”.

Spouse

A spouse under the FLA is a person who has lived with another person in a marriage-like relationship, and has done so for a continuous period of at least 2 years. There is no checkbox list to determine when there is a marriage like relationship. But here are some indicia:

  • Whether the parties lived in the same residence and, if so, what were the sleeping arrangements in the shared residence;
  • Whether the parties prepared and ate their meals together;
  • Whether the parties performed domestic chores, tasks and services together;
  • Whether the parties had sexual relations, maintained an attitude of fidelity, and communicated on a personal level with one another;
  • Whether the parties bought each other gifts and celebrated special occasions together;
  • Whether the parties shared financial arrangements and supported each other financially;
  • Whether the parties conducted themselves socially and in public as a married couple.

The presence or absence of any one of these factors is not determinative of a marriage-like relationship. The relationship must be taken in its entirety to determine whether a marriage-like relationship exists.

Lived With

As a matter of law, it is well established that parties can maintain two residences and still be in a marriage-like relationship: W. (S.L.M.) v. W. (M.R.G.), 2016 BCSC 272. “Lived with” can involve parties living under different roofs for extended periods of time.  Staying over several times per week could be found to be “cohabitation”.

  1. Contributed to the Child for at Least One Year

Expenditures by the stepparent on behalf of the stepchild that are trivial in nature or are sporadic or in the character of gestures of occasional generosity or kindness may not qualify as contributions that attract a duty to support: McConnell v. McConnell, 2007 BCSC 748 (B.C. S.C.) and D. (D.C.) v. C. (R.J.P.) 2014 BCSC 2420. The support contributions must be of a more significant nature. Examples from the case law include contributions made by the stepparent to shelter, food or vacations: Z. (O.) v. Z. (M.), 2016 BCPC 416.

Conclusion

It is very important to know your legal rights and obligations when you enter into a relationship with another person, especially when that other person has a child from a previous relationship. If you are unaware of your legal position in relation to the child, you may end up subject to unwanted support obligations.

If you are concerned about potential child support obligations or if you have any other family law concerns please contact Heath Law LLP 250-753-2202.